...dave kiss presents...

Scott H. Biram ~ Driftwood Soldier

Ages 21 and up
Tuesday, April 23
Doors: 7pm Show: 7:30pm
$20

AGE RESTRICTION: Only Ages 21+ can purchase tickets for this show. NO REFUNDS/EXCHANGES for anyone underage who purchases or attempts to use these tickets.

Doors: 7:00 PM

Show: 7:30 PM

Scott H. Biram
Scott H. Biram, a proud Texan raised on the outskirts of Austin, is a maverick in the tradition of Doug Sahm, Roky Erickson (13th Floor Elevators) and Gibby Haines (Butthole Surfers). Shortly after releasing his third record (2003’s Lo-Fi Mojo), the 28-year-old’s life was nearly cut short after a near-fatal head-on collision with a big rig semi. He was still bedridden when he made his Rehabilitation Blues EP, the predecessor to his 2005 debut for Bloodshot Records, The Dirty Old One Man Band. Flash forward to 2022. After almost thirty years of tirelessly writing, recording and touring the front and backroads of America as a solo bluesman, collecting a wide array of critical accolades, Biram found himself suddenly stopped cold by the pandemic. Once again, unwilling to allow outsized forces slow him down, he took advantage of the shutdown to write, record and produce nine new songs and two traditional covers for his new album, The One & Only Scott H. Biram, his 13th overall and 9th for Bloodshot Records. “I’m constantly trying to go back to the junky, lo-fi sounds of my early records,” says Biram. “But it’s harder to do now. The more you learn about production, the harder it is to convey that genuine unproduced feeling. I have to compromise between overproduced and lo-fi, so it sounds pro, but still keeps that grittiness.” “I tend to be all over the place. My brain’s restless. If something interests me, I’ll write a song about it. I have a kinda rootsy, blue collar approach with blues, country and folk, but I always throw in  some of my heavier influences from metal and hard rock. I consider myself a singer and guitarist, above everything else.” The music on The One and Only Scott H. Biram has the down home, in-your-face feel that Biram is noted for. “No Man’s Land” opens with a blues turnaround played on a twanging electric guitar, backed by a stomping bass and drum backbeat. Biram growls out a lyric, describing the hazards of growing up poor in a small Texas town, breathing the fumes from oil wells and brush fires. “I was remembering a bumper sticker I saw as a kid that said, ‘Oil Field Trash and Proud of It!’” 

Driftwood Soldier
Driftwood Soldier isn’t your average mandolin-bass foot-stomping gutter-folk duo. Growling and crooning, muttering about lost love, brimstone, and the glorious view from the underside of a rusty world order, Owen holds the rhythm on mandolin and foot percussion. To his left, Bobby stretches bass notes into lyrical vines that vibrate somewhere north of your liver and flower unexpectedly at night. This is the kind of roots music that grows through the cracks in a West Philly sidewalk and drinks its rainwater laced with motor oil. Their second full-length album, Stay Ahead of the Wolf, arrived late in 2019. It was produced with Erin McKeown and mixed by Grammy winner Ted Hutt. Unfazed by a world in disarray, Stay Ahead of the Wolf crawled up onto its four legs and went barrelling through the digital ether, carrying with it this strange beast’s howl.
https://driftwoodsoldier.com

Skip to content